4 Reason Why Ever Job-Seeker Needs Several Resume Versions

Here at N. Liten Resume Services we pride ourselves in providing our clients with not only resume services, but tips and consulting to help them reach their career goals. In today’s economy looking for a job in itself can be considered a full-time job. Searching through online job forms, researching careers and updating our resume. The process alone can be overwhelming and tedious. During this process, you might think having one resume can do the trick to help you land a job.

However, this is not always the case having multiple versions of your resume can help you get your foot in the door faster. Tailoring each resume for every specific industry or career field is imperative in the job-hunting process. Here are four scenarios in which having various resumes varieties can help you land a job.

  1. Same Industry, New Position – If you’ve worked as a high school science teacher for years, but are looking to teach the Scientific Method to elementary school kids, you’ll need to revamp your resume. While you can highlight your overall achievements as a teacher, you’ll need to exemplify why you’d be the best applicant to teach to a whole new demographic.
  1. Same Industry, Various Positions – In this scenario you’ve been job searching for a while, you can start to get desperate. That desperation can cause you to apply for any old job in your industry, regardless of experience. Having a resume that caters to numerous jobs within your career field not only shows your adaptability, but also makes you a more capable candidate than you would be if you sent out a resume that wasn’t really a match. Make sure to highlight your experience, but don’t skimp on your skills that are transferable in the industry.
  1. Completely New Career Field – In this scenario your previous position you were a supervisor at grocery store, but that isn’t going to transfer when you’re applying to become a new organization’s social media coordinator. Highlight the exact skills and work experiences that make you a fit for the new job. Then, build new skills and experience by volunteering, interning, freelancing, or taking on a part-time role.
  1. New Industry, New Position – Let’s just say you’ve always been a teacher for most of your professional career. However, you’ve always been interested in marketing and want to switch careers. In this scenario, you’re applying for a completely different position in a brand-new field, previous work experience doesn’t matter as much. Thus, you can emphasize all your free time outside of your current position to start working and studying for a new career in marketing. Therefore, customizing your resume will allow you to make the necessary changes needed for your new industry.

Job seekers have to be creative when looking for a job. Depending on what type of job you’re looking for, customizing your resume to shine a light on the strengths you already possess will make you the perfect candidate for the position.

Do you have different resume versions? If so, how many? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

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3 ways to structure your mixed work history

UNSURE HOW TO STRUCTURE YOUR MIXED CAREER?
3 WAYS TO FIX IT!

Questions on how to “package” or “structure” your resume from a mixed background come up all the time.  More surprisingly than not, people from all ages ask this specific question often.  There are several different ways to go about it.

First, you can’t just throw out all of your experience onto the resume, which is common.  So you need to understand where you are currently and identify what direction (career, position) you would like to move forward in.

Then once you have decided that next you need to incorporate that into a strong written profile summary on your resume/cover letter.  Then, in the body of the resume, filter out anything that doesn’t connect to the job you’re trying to get.

For example, one of my coaching clients worked for a real estate company, mostly “making sure tenants paid their rent on time,” but he wanted to be a financial analyst. “He really liked the financial analysis courses he took in college, and he excelled at them, including winning a couple of awards for projects he had worked on.  So I designed a resume around those projects and highlighted the roughly 20% of his real estate job that involved financial analysis.” The client got a financial analyst job.

It’s about reflecting where you are, identifying what direction you would like to go in and incorporating that into your resume.

Good Luck, and know that I am available via, phone, email or text to answer your questions in regards to  your career and resume.

I am Sha Von, your focus coach, ready to help y9ou focus your message for professional success!

If you need a bit of inspiration, you can visit our website at resumenlite.com, or call: 724.769.3785 to find out more ways on excelling your career to the next level through focused coaching. #nliten #titleup #focuscoach

 

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Appearance is everything…Right?

Whatever you focus on grows…

Imagination may be used effectively in even the smallest details of appearance which in result can bring you much success.

Searching for a career/ job is complicated, frustrating and rewarding if tackled correctly.

I know a few of us have been in the position where you submit your resume over to what seems to be 100 jobs and you have the sudden dread of the let downs…rejection letters and the best one, you hear nothing back at all.  Dead silence…I hate that!!

But it doesn’t have to be this way….that why I developed a workshop designed to make job hunting not only easy and fun but beneficial to your overall personal growth.  It’s about identifying the most important part of the equation to finding a job.  YOU!  Knowing the specifics and focusing them so others can receive you how you want them to.

I remember going into a job interview for my first job.  I was applying to be a host at a breakfast restaurant/ j.christophers, and when in the interview… my mind was racing with loads of negative thoughts like;

Am I dressing the part?

What if he asks me this question I don’t know?

Did I turn the curling iron off when I left?

He just glanced at my mouth…do I have something in my teeth?

All of these negative thoughts just turn into a tornado of uncertainty.

These uncertainties can hinder us from soaring to our true potential.  That’s what I will be able to provide you here.  I will be giving you 3 strategies that can help you reach that next level of confidence to withstand the overall job hunting experience.

The three strategies are very beneficial and I will walk through these and explain how you can benefit from each one.  A. stands for attire…I. stands for interview techniques and R. stands for Resume.

The first, Attire is the workshop I will be covering today and it is the most important.  Why do you think attire is most important more than Interviewing and resume?  Let’s think about it here

What we see overrides what we hear and as much as we’d hate to admit it, appearance is everything. You can look at something and immediately decide if you like it or not. This is because human beings are visual creatures.  According to, 3M Corporation and Zabisco,

  • 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000X faster in the brain than text/words.

So knowing this, we can use this information to our advantage.

I conducted several experiments with some interns where there were about 5 students and they were told to dress in a particular way in order to see how they’re appearance was received.  One dressed in wrinkly clothes, one dressed in clearly mismatched attire, one in provocative clothing and extreme make-up business casual, and the last dressed in business formal.  Mind you we sent in the ones with wrinkly clothes, and the outcome was none of the individuals who went in looking disheveled or untrustworthy received a phone call back. The ones who looked as if they had everything together did receive a call.The stats stated that 90% of the information transmitted to the brain is visual…so what information or message are you trying to relay to others?  Don’t really know yet?

The stats stated that 90% of the information transmitted to the brain is visual…so what information or message are you trying to relay to others?  Don’t really know yet?

That’s what we will dive into later..

With this A.I.R. you can soar to your highest potential.

Inside Advice for Career Planning

On average, you will probably change careers seven to ten times during your life.
Sometimes you change careers because of changes in your own needs, desires, and requirements. Sometimes you must switch careers due to changes in your profession
or industry outside your control. For these reasons, career management and planning should be a life-long endeavor. The first step in career planning is determining whether your current career meets your personal and professional needs.

Commission having a Job interview.

 

Are You in the Right Career?

To help determine whether you are in the
right career, ask yourself some of the following
questions:

  • 􀂄 Do you enjoy going to work most days?
  •  Do you enjoy what you do on the job?
  •  Are you motivated to seek advancement
    in your career?
  •  Are you willing to put in the extra effort
    to succeed in your career?
  •  Are you in a stable or growing profession
  • Do the requirements of your career
    match your lifestyle?
  •  Are you satisfied with the time commitment
    your career requires?
  •  Where do you see your career taking
    you in the next three to five years?

If you answered “Yes” to many of these
questions, you are probably in the right career.
For you, career planning will entail seeking ways to learn and grow in your career. You must determine what skills and characteristics to develop, and what additional experience you need to continue your professional development. If you answered “No” to more than a few of these questions, it may be time to consider a new career.

Gather Information about Yourself
When researching a new career you first need to understand more about your own personal and professional goals. You should develop a clear sense of what you enjoy doing,
what you don’t enjoy, and the balance you are seeking between career and lifestyle. To help you determine your personal and professional needs, review the following self-assessment topics.  Consider your talents. What are you good at?  What do others say you do well? What do you learn easily? Make an inventory of these skills, abilities, and talents and consider jobs or careers that require these attributes. Consider your interests. What do you enjoy doing? What do you wish you had more time to do? What field of study do you want to learn more about? What classes have you taken in the last three years? You will devote more energy to your career if you enjoy your work.  Consider your reward. What is important to you? What will keep you motivated and energized? Decide how important things like salary, time off, prestige, and work environment are to you and use these criteria when thinking about your new career.

Asking these and other questions, and then researching the answers, can help you narrow your choices and find the ideal career.

Stay Focused and most importantly, Stay Professional!

 

How to design a Hybrid Resume

Many eyebrows are raised when I mention they need a Hybrid resume.  What is a Hybrid resume anyways?

A hybrid resume is different from the traditional resume format, which is chronological, highlighting a long, solid work history.

Hybrid resumes can also be identified as a combination resume, highlighting relevant skills while still providing information about your work history, in a more subtle tone.  Aside from highlighting your skills and related qualification, hybrids displays reverse chronological employment history as well as masking job hopping and any unrelated experience.

First, let’s determine whether a hybrid resume is for you!

Hybrids are generally for  Students, New Graduates, Entry- Level Job seekers, Career changers, Applicants reentering the job market, and older workers.

Now let’s dive into creating a Hybrid  a.k.a. Combination resume

The main strategy is to begin with a career summary (qualifications summary or skills).  This emphasizes your strongest potential and credentials.  According to an article written by, Kim Issacs, Monster Resume Expert, she also states that mentioning this, in the beginning, you have the opportunity to, ” entice hiring managers to read the rest of your resume.”  Include, your key skills and accomplishments related to the skills relevant to the position you are applying for.

Create a section of core competencies that others can acknowledge your expertise.  These points can range anywhere from a table of 9 points of core competencies or 6.  Keep it rather short.

When listing out your employment history, keep the format chronological order.  This format most employers are used to seeing.  Ensure you are not listing the responsibilities, though, just generalized information regarding your skills.  Just the Facts!

Be clear and concise when including your experience section.  Focus on your achievements rather than job duties.  This will show your participation within that organization and how your participation allowed the company to benefit from it.

Don’t forget to add in any training, certifications and/or languages and education to your resume as well.   Look it over and read it twice or you can pay to have a professional review it over or ask family and friends. You can always go back and modify your resume based on feedback and response rate.How to create a Hybrid Resume

 

Have you hit a dead spot???

Do you think your resume is average or just ok?  Hvae you even thought about your resume??

Leaving your resume hanging to dry is probably not a good idea.  “Some tech pros update their résumés and profiles every time they learn a new skill or accomplish something notable; done often enough, it Becomes a habit,” states Dice staff.

There are a few instances when you can update your resume.

The obvious one: When you leave a job for another.

Two:  You learn a new skill

Three:  You finished a project

The point of a resume is citing your accomplishments and giving the specifics: what you did, and how you did it.

“In today’s job market, with lay-offs and downsizing, being unemployed for a few months is typical. If you’ve been job-hunting longer than three months, try to find a volunteer, part-time or temporary position within your field. Register with a temp agency—an employer may have a short-term project requiring additional staff, but would rather not hire full-time or permanent engineers [who also have to be paid benefits],”  advises Lisa Dickter, associate director for Career Consultants Carnegie Mellon’s Career and Professional Development Center, Pittsburgh, PA.

Stay up to date with trending information about resumes and industry highlights.  Don’t let time get away from you, use these helpful hints in the post to manage your resume for that next position.

 

 

Social Media & YOU

 

Which social media platform works best for you?
Does one gain you more viewers?
It’s all in your message. Remember that all your social media sites are relatable to your PROFESSIONAL side.


Incorporate your contribution to the community by adding your volunteer organization to your pages or pictures of you engaging in an activity.
We will post later this week some sites that can help promote your presence to employers.

 

TWITTER

Twitter is a great way to stay relevant on current information and to post this bits about your professionalism. Stay professional though, employers check Twitter feeds as often as Facebook pages.

 

QUORA

Quora is a great way to show your skills by answering questions people have. You are basically a google reference for others who need the answers.

FACEBOOK

In a sea of pictures it can be easy to spot out candidates that are professional and not professional.  Be sure to post clean exciting pictures on Facebook.  An article from Huffington Post states, “A survey commissioned by the online employment website CareerBuilder has found that 37 percent of hiring managers use social networking sites to research job applicants, with over 65 percent of that group using Facebook as their primary resource.”

These are just a few samples of some sites that can help promote you and your professional message.  If you know of any more please feel free to share!  Stay focused and most importantly stay PROFESSIONAL!

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